Magway

Division

Magway divison is the second largest of Myanmar’s seven divisions, situated in central Myanmar. An ancient city of the Pyu, Beikthano, about 2000years old is located in Taungdwingyi, Magway region.

Capital – Magaway

Languages major – Myanmar

Industries – Agriculture

Car, Train

Myathalun

Shwe Sattaw

The Thiho Shin Pagoda

Sale Yoke Sone Kyaung

Archeological & Culture – Pagodas, Monasteries, “Spirit”, Worship Culture

Art & Craft – Pottery Shed

Special Activities –shwe Settaw Wild life Sanctuary


Myathalun

Steaming into Magway, the revering traveler is greeted by the sight of the Myathalun Pagoda glinting serenely from the summit of the Naguttama hillock hard by the bank of the Ayeyarwaddy River. Being one of the greatly venerated shrines, and also because Magway lies midway between the upcountry and the lower parts, its annual festival has served as a great fair for the exchange of local goods. According to legend the original pagoda had a height of about 55.5feet (16.9m) and was built by U Baw Gyaw and his wife the daughter of a certain Mahabawga, a man of great wealth with an official title.

Shwe Sattaw

A pair of Buddha’s Footprints are located in Settawya, a forest retreat at 34 mile distant west of Minbu on the opposite bank of Magway which is 331 miles from Yangon by road. The footprints are well preserved and shrines were constructed nearly. The place is known as the Pagoda site of the forest. The pilgrimage is combined with flicking for young people as the scenery is picturesque with a full taste of natural atmosphere. The festival is held on the fifth waxing moon of the Myanmar calendar month, Tabodwe (February and March) annually. Many people from different parts of the country gather there and make meritorious deeps singly or collectively.

Beikthano

Beikthano (around Magway), this ancient Pyu site is located near Taungdwingyi, a small town 82km southeast of Magway. Strong interests in ruins are piles of bricks, melting city walls and a few temple foundations. Excavations here have uncovered beads, terracotta votives, stone and metal art objects, skeleton remains, stucco-relief fragments, silver coins, pot shards and burial urns. The design of these items and their Pyu inscriptions indicate links with the Pyu principalities of Thayekhittaya and Hanlin, but little else is known about the city-state. Some of the artifacts are displayed in a museum in Taungdwingyi. The old palace site sits a little northwest of the center of the rectangle formed by the city walls. Just west of the old palace, a large pond called Ingyikan, an ancient reservoir still used by the villagers of Inywagyi.